Spheres

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McMinnville, Oregon August 21, 2017 7:13 am

The sun, the moon, the earth.

The fortieth anniversary of the Voyager Spacecraft launching was eclipsed by, well, the eclipse.  Because our little party of five couldn’t cope with after eclipse traffic out of  the little town of McMinnville, Oregon, we took advantage of the local museum’s invitation to extend our visit after the moon blocked out the sun.  The  Evergreen Air and Space Museum had hosted an early morning coffee, donuts and parking lot event for those who could get to the edge of totality and could spring for a $5 ticket.  As an added bonus, the museum threw over its usual program of events for a free viewing of a program about Voyager I and II, the unmanned probes that managed fly by scannings of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.

I cried my way through a lot of a big screen PBS documentary.

I might have been a bit overtired after the 4am departure time for the big event. I had driven my old (now my daughter’s ) ancient minivan, long without working air conditioning, for about an hour and then waited in the dark and early dawn in a car line at the museum parking lot entrance for another hour.  I stared at the sun for about an hour and 15 minutes before it went dark for the extraordinary 56 seconds. Afterwards, I  waited a long time for lunch at a local diner, because there was one heck of a lot of people trying to get some eggs and recover from the  stunning event in the sky.

Maybe I’m just an overtired old lady,  or maybe it was something else.

My parents’ “family room” had a wall of books and several shelves were devoted to copies of National Geographic. It’s hard to imagine now, but those magazines were considered near to gold to our family. They were not to be cut up, drawn in, or thrown away. They had the keys to interesting happenings all over the world, and there were color pictures.  I remember a giant tree that a car could drive through. I remember photos of huge white capped mountains, some of which I live near today.

Most of all, I remember a fold out color diagram of the solar system with a picture of the Voyager Spacecraft and the plan for its launch when I got to High School!!! and the dates it would pass by each planet. I looked at each date and I marveled at how old I would be when it got to each planet. I read about the golden record that was meant as a message to aliens. I wondered if I might be living on the moon, or at least have visited, by the time I was…what? 47?  Would I even live that long?  Would the aliens have found the record by the time I was that old?

Even at age 8 or 9, I thought the alien contacts perhaps a remote possibility.  I was a sensible kid.  A trip to the moon, well, maybe not so hard.  That certainly was possible. Perhaps on Pan Am.

Getting older in some ways is about getting more realistic. Since Voyager, by all accounts an astounding success (we are still receiving signals, and both vessels have left the solar system) we had the tragedy of two space shuttle accidents , more glories with the Martian Rover and some failed efforts with travel to the Red Planet as well.  As a younger person, I expected progress to be linear. Line em up, get it done.  If you can get to the moon, off we go to Mars. No unexpected explosions.  Science rules.

I  fully expected a Mars colony by now. Apparently not so simple.  Mars, as it turns out, is pretty far away, and there’s no air. Weird stuff happens to living beings when you stick them out in a small space capsule for a long time. Building materials are expensive to transport.  People are adapted to life on, well, Earth.

On top of all that they demoted Pluto.

I really do wish in some ways I could have been an astronaut, but my applied math skills are solidly above average and not outstanding. I tend to get motion sick and my eyes were out of focus by first grade. So, physiology and inclination led me in other directions.  I have had to come to terms with my limited contribution to human progress, and I’m not sure I’ve done much at all. I envy those space engineers who know, beyond a doubt, that they have contributed something extraordinary with the design and execution of Voyager.

So human beings are limited, and somewhat disappointing, and life is wondrous and disappointing and  and we occupy the tiniest bit of space and time, and it’s what we’ve got, and the eclipse, with its unexpected changes in the weather and the wind, along with the eery absence of daylight, was both shocking and awe inspiring.  Carl Sagan’s voice ( I smiled, I hadn’t heard it for years) in the movie, with  his signature “billions and billions of stars in the universe” and his eloquent description of the how the earth looks from Neptune, a tiny, tiny blue dot, with “everyone who you know, and ever knew, and everyone who ever lived” is on that dot, and how that dot  is barely visible from one of our nearest planetary neighbors, and how it is easily mistaken for a speck of dust on a photographic print.  Dr. Sagan’s voice is  clear, and in the movies I remember my childhood, and am aware that just hours before,  I watched a full horizon twilight, and watched the sun go out, and looked at my daughter’s face, and the faces of her friends, and knew that we take life, with all its limitations, and something as basic as the sun, and its satellite, the moon, for granted.

 

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McMinnville, Oregon August 21, 2017 about 10:18 am.  The sun.th

Dr. Carl Sagan

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sb4WhNvLRFw  The Pale Blue Dot

 

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Glass Spheres

“… The lunatic is on the grass./ The lunatic is on the grass./ Remembering games and daisy chains and laughs./ Got to keep the loonies on the path.” – Pink Floyd, Dark Side of the Moon

No one from my office had a camera.  We looked around at each other and the human spectacle.  We looked at our feet on the sidewalk…we made small talk.  The sky was blue, and there wasn’t much wind.  Someone had a welder’s mask, like a ritual mask from a different time.

I was expecting an alien invasion with Independence Day destruction.  What else could there be, with tiny bright crescents in the tree shadows, the spiders taking down their webs, birds falling from the sky, mosquitoes believing in their blood dusk, the confusion of wandering herds, distant crop circles bringing in the day? 

An acquaintance of mine, a famous writer from some invaded place with trilled “rrrr”’s and Klingon sounding words… said that as children they would stain pieces of glass with smoke and soot by holding them over a candle….and watch an eclipse that way. 

We escaped the office, hundreds of us, to watch the shadow of the moon.  A group of strangers trading vision, a way to get outside, something different in the daily routine.  No camera to trap the images in paper, no souvenir to save.  Memory a useless thing. I saw the crescent of sun behind dark glasses.   No totality of darkness, just a moment of cold and soft light.  

The gathering of the tribe to watch the Sun…the immediacy of that moment…from the office to the meadow.  All of us….no bell sounded, we all journeyed out.  People who are looking at the world as if they’re not a part of it.  You’ve written about life seen from behind glass, the homeless people seen in the park from a skyscraper window, the sculpture of an Indian – a spirit locked in a museum, the perfect workers behind the boxes of one building, held inside the window of another.  Workers encrusted in the language of glass.  

It’s a point of view I understand, the outsider, the alien,  such a word with its many connotations… foreign, an immigrant, an outsider, an original, an emoticon, a stranger in a strange land.  It’s easy to feel alienated, disconnected, disenfranchised.  We’re riding a merry-go-round, travelers in a circle that seemingly isn’t going anywhere.  Time draws a straight line through it.  We look through a glass, darkly.  Not part of the culture of the office, not part of the people in the park….we live in our little boxes, on the hillside, with our ticky-tacky lives, seeking Melvina Reynolds songs to give us courage. 

It’s an interesting thought: we travel from screen to screen.  Maybe window to window, like a woman locked in a tower before she goes mad.   Glass screen to glass…the world filtered away, or focused into parts and realities we can choose and  can bear and carry.  Such a different reality from that of a man in a teepee, or a sod hut, a Hogan or yurt, or that of say, a woman in a cabin.  Their world being what they can see from the flap of a tent, or a nice knotty-pine porch.  The first people named the grasses and the constellations and the animals and the trees.  The wildflowers.  I feel like we can’t see the stars anymore…somehow we’re looking into the ground, into our own graves.

You reminded me of things behind glass…zoo animals, the butterflies of Nabokov,  pastries in Paris, or Lenin in his glass coffin…we’ve purchased tickets and are lined-up to visit.  A gruesome show to put a body behind glass.  Must stay away from glass boxes and go where the ragged people go.  Throw away the ticket stub.  And yet, how beautiful glass can be.  The altering of light.  Again I wish to alter time, to be with you when the sun went dark!   I could’ve, but so many plans I didn’t make.

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“Seeing a partial eclipse bears the same relation to seeing a total eclipse as kissing a man does to marrying him, Or as flying in an airplane does to falling out of an airplane.”   –Annie Dillard 

Martian snow and diamond rain.  The words themselves a beautiful combination. 

“..let the sunshine, let the sunshine in…”  – Age of Aquarius, Hair

We are eclipsed by our faults, we can’t achieve the focus or experience of a lifetime now, too late.  Ironic now that we understand that the best way to make a difference is to focus on just one thing.  Jane Goodall always outdid us all.  And Yo-Yo Ma.  But how can a person not want to study everything, every single thing?  The best things I know are the names of wildflowers….but of course there is the accompanying image.  Useless information really.  It’s necessary to eat, and to take care of our own health and welfare.   On the grand scale, the focus of our society should be on human being’s health and welfare, and how obviously our madness has no bounds.  That is to say, mental health care should be of primary concern….

Middle English lunatik, from Anglo-French or Late Latin; Anglo-French lunatic, from Late Latin lunaticus, from Latin luna; from the belief that lunacy fluctuated with the phases of the moon.

Our leaders talk in circles and we watch them from our tiny screens.   The shadow of the moon traveling across the U.S. at 18,000 mph, hits quickly, making history and destroying history….because it replaces the past experience of men…how did Orwell carry such truth in his human brain?   How quickly the past seems to change.  But to willfully destroy it?  Alright, try to control what is evil then…. but make a museum of misfortune, a tribute to tolerance, down the stairs, to the left, a padded room for screams of injustice.  To take down a statue is just giving evil a chance to pop up elsewhere, in camouflage.   The focus of the public eye changes so quickly, from flashing image to image…a montage of quick cuts…from healthcare to Korea, to Russia, to scandal and back….it’s a merry-go-round, but not merry.   Human history at the speed of light.

This is a world I feel unfamiliar with.  A world it’s difficult to look at directly.  But I think the glass is sterile and unreal.  I have had some success looking at the bright glimpses in the shadows.   If nothing else we can enjoy the teaspoons of Moon.

We walked through corridors and elevators and found ourselves outside.  Some sat on granite picnic benches and some gathered near trees.  And there we were, as people from centuries before, gathering to look up together at the sky.

 

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http://www.wnyc.org/story/annie-dillards-total-eclipse

Daily prompt, no corners

Visceral

j

Glass as Dark Matter

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I’m sitting on a train, moving rather slowly, then stopping.

Yesterday was business, busy-ness. A multicultural quorum links up in a glass enclosed, grey walled conference room with views of the next building. There’s a coffee robot programmed to autocoffee everyone and twenty somethings sitting in smaller glass boxes, together in body but not in spirit, eyes down on the screens. They are quite beautiful, in a perfectly science-fictiony sort of way. One of them sits with the elder brain trust hive-mind, her braided hair piled high on her head, precisely speaking in her workforce jargon. Clear skin smart and tailored, she really can recite the language. I think of a seven year old piano player I heard play once, a technically amazing child and his piano, not old enough for any musical feeling.

I want to tickle the twenty something assistant and ask her if she’d ever spilled anything. Or if she’s afraid to. She’s too sweet or too perfect to deliberately fluster, although I consider it, a rather unprofessional thought.

Outside, also science-fictiony, the city swelters at 95 degrees. The brain trust and the coffee robot are safe and cool and intellectually elevated, but the homeless people, in the park, hide in sweatshirts that are way too warm. I saw them when I walked to the cool office on the fourth floor. I’m sure there were heat related deaths as we met and thought and latted in the glass box. If I am right, it was the park folks that overheated, and that information won’t make the news.  On screen news is for the senator, the rock star, and the ex football star, the people who are welcomed into glass offices. I was tempted to talk with the park dwellers, how did they end up living in a park? I didn’t. The park people are time travelers and their stories may not correspond to my lines and boxes; I feel I’m a slave to a clock on a phone. I worry about being late.

I answer my own questions about them with well known theories about how people end up in parks and under bridges.

There’s trash on the edges of the train tracks, and the shattered glass glints and shines and looks a mess. It’s mixed with paper and plastic, waylaid on the route to recycling.

After my glass box time, I head to the museum. The poor we have always had with us, suggests the  exhibition. Here is a portrait of an industrialist who built roads and bridges and fed the hungry and exploited the workers and stole the land. Here’s an Indian who was hated and hunted in life and now his effigy lays carved in static elegant white marble, not worrisome in death, in fact, he can now go into glass offices if we could hoist him up there, but he’s rather heavy now and so he stays where he is. In life he would have broken the glass windows and showed up half naked in animal skins, a presentation now boxed into video pornography, pretend wildness purchasable with plastic. He is running right out of the woods, not just on a screen for someone’s sexual exploitation or carved still for some post mortem admiration, but for his own purposes.

And he runs into the city park, right under the windows on the fourth floor, where the brain trust tries to figure out what to do with him.  Again.20170720_171419